All posts by dshapiro

Call for Proposals, ALA Annual 2015

Conference programs and preconferences for Annual 2015!

The LITA Program Planning Committee (PPC) is now accepting innovative and creative proposals for the 2015 Annual American Library Association Conference.  We’re looking for full day pre-conference ideas as well as 60- and 90-minute conference presentations. The focus should be on technology in libraries, whether that’s use of, new ideas for, trends in, or interesting/innovative projects being explored – it’s all for you to propose. In 2014, we received over 60 proposals, resulting in 20 great LITA programs at the 2014 Annual Conference, all of which came from contributions like yours. We look forward to hearing the great ideas you will share with us this year.

When/Where is the Conference?

The 2015 Annual ALA Conference will be held  in San Francisco, California, from June 25th through 30th.

What kind of topics are we looking for?

We’re looking for programs of interest to all library/information agency types, that inspire technological change and adoption, or/and generally go above and beyond the everyday.

Some successful topics in the 2014 included: Practical Linked Data with Open Source (Full-day preconference); Technology Priorities for the New Library Reality; Building Gorgeous Responsive Websites with Twitter-Bootstrap. Some topics we are interested in are: library hackathons; data management & curation; responsive web design; homegrown technology tools, especially projects that adapt popular technologies in use outside libraries, for library use.

When are proposals due?

September 2, 2014

How I do submit a proposal?

Fill out this form http://bit.ly/LiCFP15

Program descriptions should be 75 words or less.

When will I have an answer?

The committee will be reviewing proposals after September 2; final decisions will be made by October 1.

Do I have to be a member of ALA/LITA? or a LITA Interest Group (IG) or a committee?

No! We welcome proposals from anyone who feels they have something to offer regarding library technology. Unfortunately, we are not able to provide financial support for speakers. Because of the limited number of programs, LITA IGs and Committees will receive preference where two equally well written programs are submitted. Presenters may be asked to combine programs or work with an IG/Committee where similar topics have been proposed.

Got another question?

Please feel free to email Deb Shapiro (PPC chair) (dsshapiro@wisc.edu)

LITA is now accepting program proposals for ALA Annual 2014

The LITA Program Planning Committee (PPC) is now accepting innovative and creative proposals for the 2014 Annual American Library Association Conference.  We’re looking for full day pre-conference ideas as well as 90 minute conference presentations. The focus should be on technology in libraries, whether that’s use of, new ideas for, trends in, or interesting/innovative projects being explored – it’s all for you to propose. In 2013, we received roughly 40 proposals, resulting in 20 great LITA programs at the 2013 Annual Conference, all of which came from contributions like yours. We look forward to hearing the great ideas you will share with us this year.

New ALA Conference Guidelines [June 2012]

  • All divisions are limited to accepting 20 programs each.
  • All programs will be 90 minutes, located in the convention center, and will be recorded.
  • All proposal submissions will need to choose a Conference Track. Please see Appendix A in the Roadmap here (http://connect.ala.org/node/178761) for more details.
  • Vendors wishing to submit a proposal should partner with a library representative who is using the product. The library/librarian should submit the proposal.

*When/Where is the Conference?*

2014 Annual ALA Conference, Las Vegas, NV: June 26-July 1, 2014

*What kind of topics are we looking for? *

We’re looking for programs that can scale to all library types, inspire technological change and adoption, or/and generally go above and beyond the everyday.

Some successful topics in 2013 included Gamifying Your Library; Makerspaces; MOOCs. Some topics we are interested in are: Data Management & Curation; Responsive Web Design; Homegrown Technology Tools.

*When are proposals due? *

August 25, 2013

*How I do submit a proposal? *

Fill out this form http://bit.ly/LITA14pro

**Program descriptions should be 75 words or less.

*When will I have an answer? *

The committee will be reviewing proposals after August 25; final decisions will be made in September.

*Do I have to be a member of ALA/LITA/an IG/a committee?*

No! We welcome proposals from anyone who feels they have something to offer regarding library technology. Unfortunately, we are not able to provide financial support for speakers. Because of the limited number of programs, LITA IGs and Committees will receive preference where two equally well written programs are submitted. Presenters may be asked to combine programs or work with an IG/Committee where similar topics have been proposed.

*Got another question?*

Please feel free to email me (PPC chair) (dsshapiro@wisc.edu) and the group will figure it out.

Kevin Ford awarded 1st SemTechBiz Spotlight

The SemanticWeb.com Spotlight on Library Innovation
Update

Thank you for all the nominations we received for the first Semantic Web.com Spotlight on Innovation in Libraries.

We are pleased to announce that Kevin Ford, from the Network Development and MARC Standards Office at the Library of Congress, was selected for the Semantic Web.com Spotlight on Innovation for his work with the Bibliographic Framework Initiative (BIBFRAME) and his continuing work on the Library of Congress’s Linked Data Service (loc.id). In addition to being an active contributor, Kevin is responsible for the BIBFRAME website; has devised tools to view MARC records and the resulting BIBFRAME resources side-by-side; authored the first transformation code for MARC data to BIBFRAME resources; and is project manager for The Library of Congress’ Linked Data Service. Kevin also writes and presents frequently to promote BIBFRAME, ID.LOC.GOV, and educate fellow librarians on the possibilities of linked data.

Without exception, each nominee represented great work and demonstrated the power of Linked Data in library systems, making it a difficult task for the committee, and sparking some interesting discussions about future such spotlight programs.

Congratulations, Kevin, and thanks to all the other great library linked data projects nominated!

TheSemanticWeb.com Spotlight on Library Innovation team

We’d also like to remind the library community that the Semantic Technology and Business Conference is well worth experiencing. SemTechBiz brings together industry thought leaders and practitioners to explore the challenges and opportunities jointly impacting both business leaders and technologists. Conference sessions include technical talks and case studies that highlight semantic technology applications in action. The program includes tutorials and over 130 sessions and demonstrations as well as a hackathon, start-up competition, exhibit floor, and networking opportunities.

As supporters of the SemanticWeb.com Library Spotlight, LITA and OCLC members will get a 50% discount on a gold conference pass – use discount code LITA or OCLC when registering -

LITA members – http://semtechbizsf2013.semanticweb.com/?c=stsflita – discount code “lita” minus quotes

OCLC members – http://semtechbizsf2013.semanticweb.com/?c=stsfoclc – discount code “oclc” minus quotes

SemanticWeb.com Spotlight on Library Innovation

Have you been working on a linked data project for your library? Or do you know someone doing great work promoting or demonstrating the benefits of linked data for libraries? If so, consider nominating yourself or that colleague for first the SemanticWeb.com “Spotlight on Library Innovation”!

Offered by SemanticWeb.com, supported by OCLC and LITA, the Spotlight will provide a selected individual with the chance to showcase his or her work with linked data and semantic web technologies at the Semantic Technology and Business Conference 2013, June 2 – 5, in San Francisco.

If you know of someone working on an interesting project, nominate him or her for the Spotlight. Note that the project can be ongoing, but significant practical work should have been accomplished prior to March 31, 2013. The Spotlight opportunity gives one selected individual space on the conference program to give a short, lightning-style talk about their work. Travel & lodging costs during the conference will be paid by OCLC, plus a full conference pass from Semantic.Web.com.

Nominations (http://bit.ly/11K9uzJ) for the Spotlight are being accepted through May 10. Self-nominations cheerfully accepted.

Even if you do not nominate anyone, the Semantic Technology and Business Conference is well worth experiencing. SemTechBiz brings together industry thought leaders and practitioners to explore the challenges and opportunities jointly impacting both business leaders and technologists. Conference sessions include technical talks and case studies that highlight semantic technology applications in action. The program includes tutorials and over 130 sessions and demonstrations as well as a hackathon, start-up competition, exhibit floor, and networking opportunities.

As supporters of the SemanticWeb.com Library Spotlight, LITA and OCLC members will get a 50% discount on a gold conference pass – use discount code LITA or OCLC when registering -

LITA members – http://semtechbizsf2013.semanticweb.com/?c=stsflita – discount code “lita” minus quotes

OCLC members – http://semtechbizsf2013.semanticweb.com/?c=stsfoclc – discount code “oclc” minus quotes

Thanks and good luck!

Google and the University of Michigan Library Digitization Project

Rebecca Dunkle, librarian at University of Michigan (UM), and Ben Bunnell from Google, spoke about UM’s experience working with Google, as they begin what will be roughly a 6-year project to digitize 7 million volumes at UM. (Abigail Potter, a recent grad of the Information School at Michigan, now working at NPR, who worked on the Google Project while still at UM was also on hand to answer questions).

The general outlines of the project are familiar to most of us, having been presented previously: Google, as if by magic, since the technology is proprietary and they can’t tell us about it, is non-destructively digitizing the entire bound print collection at UM (and also portions of 4 other research libraries; New York Public Library, Stanford, Harvard, and Oxford) . The scanning is resulting in page images and OCR files, all up to agreed upon digital preservation standards that have been established by the library community. Michigan will receive its own copies of all the files created, and will be able to host them on their own servers and build them into new digital library services.

Dunkle made it clear that Google and UM are partners in this project – Google is not forcing the library to do anything it doesn’t want to do. She also pointed out that even though there are unresolved issues, such as the full impact that this fully dual digital/print collection will have on UM staff, the advantages of getting this huge corpus of digital texts are enormous.

Bunnell showed screenshots of the Google Print interface for public domain books, where users can page through the entire book online, and in-copyright books, where they can only see 3 (un-printable) snippets, but also get a list of how many times their search terms occur in the whole book; e.g. we are only showing you three, but your words occur in this book 57 times. Both the public domain and in-copyright views allow user to find the book in libraries or buy it. Bunnell also showed the interface for books submitted directly by publishers, which allow users to access considerably more than the snippets.

The questions were the best part of the program, since attendees brought up lots of pertinent points, such as – the interface for the books submitted directly from publishers does NOT include the “find in library” link (wonder why?); UM & Google’s approach to simply do everything is going to result in the scanning of a lot of bound journals, many of which certainly exist digitally already; although Bunnell assures us (as other Google representatives also have) that GooglePrint is NOT in competition with other, existing, robust, digitizing programs at many libraries and cultural institutions, surely funding for local digitizing projects is going to diminish as a result of Google’s massive efforts; and no, they won’t let us buy their technology. Also mentioned was recent OCLC collection analysis work on the Google 5 (reported in Sept. D-Lib http://www.dlib.org/dlib/september05/lavoie/09lavoie.html) that shows that about 60% of the books to be digitized in the project are only held by ONE of the Google 5, only 20% are held by two, and only 3% are held by all five. The shockingly high number is that 80% of the books in the Google 5 libraries are still in copyright, so even though the full text will be digitized, only the snippets will be available. Although it is probably more productive if we stop thinking of the visible part of in-copyright books as snippets, and start thinking of them as indexing – a point brought up by danah boyd in her keynote, and echoed by Rebecca Dunkle – danah said that she couldn’t wait for Google to finish digitizing so that more of the volumes lying around her house would be indexed; Dunkle related her experience handing over books retrieved from offsite storage to users who take one look at them and say “not what I expected”; she expects the snippets and keyword counts to reduce the number of times this scenario plays out, and feels this is just one of several outcomes that make the whole project worthwhile.