Category Archives: Committees and Interest Groups

Major category for Committee and Interest Group business

LITA Bylaws & Organization Committee – IG Renewal Document

One of the jobs of the LITA Bylaws & Organization Committee is to oversee the formation and dissolution of LITA Interest Groups. I’ve created and updated a document that has both current names and dates of LITA Interest Groups, renewal dates, and past IGs that have been dissolved.

LITA Interest Group document

If anyone has any questions, please let me know: griffey at gmail.com

Meet your Board at Annual (including online!)

LITA Board portraint

Back: David Lee King, Rachel Vacek, Jenny Reiswig, Cindi Blyberg, Mary Taylor, Jason Griffey.
Front: Zoe Stewart-Marshall, John Blyberg, Aaron Dobbs, Andromeda Yelton, Lauren Pressley

Hi! We’re the Board, and we’d like to meet you.

Whether you’ll be in Vegas next week or not, there are lots of ways you can get in touch with us, get involved with what LITA’s doing, and tell us how you’d like us to represent you. Here’s your handy list of where we’re likely to be during Annual. Come chat with us!

Social media and Online

Programs and Social Events

LITA Open House
New to LITA? Want to learn more? Start here!

  • Friday, June 27, 2014 – 3:00pm to 4:00pm
  • Las Vegas Convention Center S224

Top Tech Trends

LITA Awards Presentation and President’s Program
Featuring Kimberly Bryant of Black Girls Code!

  • Sunday, June 29, 2014 – 3:00pm to 4:00pm
  • Las Vegas Convention Center S233

LITA Happy Hour

  • Sunday, June 29, 2014 – 5:30pm to 8:00pm
  • Kahunaville in the Treasure Island Hotel & Casino, 3300 Las Vegas Blvd S.

Check out the rest of LITA’s programs at Annual, too.

Board and Committee Meetings

Per the ALA open meeting policy, all meetings are open to all members (though some may have closed portions). You are welcome to attend.

Executive Committee

  • Friday, June 27, 2014 – 8:30am to 9:30am
  • Las Vegas Hotel Conference Room 03
  • Hashtag: #litabd
  • Agenda

All Committees Meeting
Most of LITA’s committees meet during this time slot. If you’re thinking of getting involved and want to learn more, this is a great chance to do so.

  • Saturday, June 28, 2014 – 10:30am to 11:30am
  • Las Vegas Convention Center Exhibit Hall, Mtg Rm A

LITA Board I

  • Saturday, June 28, 2014 – 1:30pm to 4:30pm
  • Las Vegas Convention Center S224
  • Hashtag: #litabd
  • Agenda

LITA Board II

  • Monday, June 30, 2014 – 1:30pm to 4:30pm
  • Las Vegas Convention Center N217
  • Hashtag: #litabd
  • Agenda

Hey, you read all the way to the bottom of the post! You’re awesome. High five. You deserve kittens.

adorable sleepy kittens hugging each other adorably

LITA Bylaws Review Underway

Based on conversations at Board meetings, as well as an attempt to fix a number of issues that have arisen over the last 2-3 years (specifically issues around officers and timing of elections) the Bylaws committee has began work on analyzing the LITA Bylaws.

For those of you that are new to LITA, or just haven’t been enthralled by parliamentary process like some of us, the Bylaws are the rules by which the Division operates. The LITA Manual lays out responsibilities and operational issues, but the Bylaws are the rules by which the organization operates. Want to know how to start an IG? That’s in the bylaws.

After discussions within the Bylaws Committee, and examining how such a review of those specific sections relating to elections and officers would need to occur, our conclusion was that a large part of the current issues have been caused by just this sort of partial-rewriting over the years. Because the Bylaws are an interconnected document, we felt like the best way to tackle solutions to the issues presented would be with a comprehensive review, starting at the sections that are most needed, but then following the implications throughout the Bylaws in order to ensure that we cover all possible areas of disagreement.

As a result, we’ve begun this process. Our goals are twofold: to specifically close the holes that we have uncovered over the last few years, but also to compare/contrast our bylaws with those of ALA proper and harmonize them when that makes sense to do so.

Our timeline is to try to review 2 sections of the Bylaws per month, and then review and discuss at monthly meetings to ensure that we all understand what’s been done and agree that the changes are appropriate. We are doing this in a public google doc:

http://bit.ly/lita_bylaws_review

We have just met and discussed our first round of comments and suggested changes…we wanted to test the process before we presented it to both the Board and the membership.

The google doc is open to editing by the Committee, but open to comment by anyone with the link. We would like to have as transparent a process as possible, by asking for commentary and inviting members to follow along as we work our way through a more streamlined set of bylaws. We will also be publicizing our next few meetings and streaming them here on LITABlog so that members can chime in with questions, or just follow our progress.

The goal that we have set for ourselves is to have a draft of the revised bylaws to present to the Board prior to the Annual meeting, with the expectation of discussing issues at that meeting. Assuming the discussion is satisfactory, we’ll then begin the process of moving to to membership for formal review, before putting the Bylaws changes up to vote. There’s a process in, you guessed it, the Bylaws about how this is done. This isn’t going to be something that happens tomorrow; it will likely take most of the rest of 2014 to complete. But I think that at the end we’ll have a set of bylaws that will enable LITA to be a more flexible and nimble division moving forward.

LITA Web Course Available: Building Web Applications with HTML5, CSS3, and Javascript

LITA is announcing the availability of Building Web Applications with HTML5, CSS3, and Javascript: An Introduction to HTML5, presented by Jason Clark of Montana State University Library, from 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. CST on January 6, 8, 10, and 13, 2014.
Geolocation, Native video, Offline storage, Semantic markup elements, Responsive web design, Canvas elements, Voice input, Drag and Drop, Opacity, Gradients… HTML5 (a generic term that includes new HTML tags, enhanced CSS styles/behaviors and new Javascript APIs) has been released and is changing the way Web developers work. With wide support in mobile browsers and the latest browser releases from Google and Firefox, HTML5 is poised to be the technology that will help build the next version of the Web.
Building Web Applications with HTML5, CSS3, and Javascript: An Introduction to HTML5 will consist of four live lectures held 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. CST, January 6, 8, 10, and 13, 2014, with additional self-paced modules in Moodle. Participants will examine the trends and enhancements that HTML5, CSS3 and the new Javascript APIs enable. Participants will talk through the specifics of implementation and work through building a prototype HTML5 application.
For registration and additional information, visit: www.ala.org/lita/learning/online

Marta M. Deyrup receives Award for Distinguished Service

Marta M. Deyrup of Seton Hall University Libraries is the recipient of the 2013 Distinguished Service Award, granted by the New Jersey Library Association’s College and University Section / Association of College and Research Libraries New Jersey chapter. This honor is awarded annually to an individual who, by his or her outstanding contributions, has directly enriched the profession of librarianship in New Jersey.

This award honors Marta’s excellent, energetic, prolific, and long-standing contributions to New Jersey librarianship both in information literacy instruction and as an international educator, editor and writer in information science.

Marta has twice received the prestigious Researcher of the Year Award at Seton Hall University Libraries. She has long been an active participant in NJLA CUS/ACRL-NJ. She was a member of the team that won the first NJLA CUS/Technology Innovation Award in 2002 for “Information Literacy in the Wired University.” She has served the VALE Committee on Information Literacy, the VALE Committee on Bibliographic Control and Metadata and is an active member of the VALE Assessment, Evaluation and Statistics Committee where she helped to create the new VALE Survey Planning Checklist.

Marta currently serves as Acquisitions Editor for LITA Guides and is on the editorial boards for the Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship as well as the Technical Services Quarterly. She has written extensively on technologies and scholarship in librarianship and has contributed to the literature for Slavic librarians.

Along with her many contributions, Marta has also served as the Co-Director of the Elizabeth Ann Seton Center for Women’s Studies at Seton Hall University. She has also served as a Fulbright Senior Specialist in Library Science for the Institut Morocain d’Information Scientifique et Technique in Morocco as well as for the University of Zadar in Croatia.

Marta received her Master of Library and Information Science at Rutgers University and her PhD in Slavic Languages and Literature at Columbia University.

A formal presentation of the award will take place at the College and University Section’s luncheon at 12:30 pm on Wednesday June 5th 2013 at the NJLA Conference at Revel Hotel, Atlantic City, NJ. Please join the NJLA-CUS/ACRL-NJ Executive Board in offering Marta congratulations and appreciation for the many years she has dedicated to the academic library profession.

March issue of ITAL available

I’m pleased to announce the publication of the March issue of Information Technology and Libraries.

Issue contents are listed below. To receive automatic notifications of future issues, please subscribe to ITAL.

Suggestions and feedback are always welcome, please send to:

Bob Gerrity
ITAL Editor
gerrityr (at) gmail.com


Information Technology and Libraries
Volume 32, Number 1 (March 2013)
CONTENTS

Editorials

Bob Gerrity

Editor’s Comments

Patrick “Tod” Colegrove

Editorial Board Thoughts: Libraries as Makerspace?

Articles

Danielle Becker and Lauren Yannotta

Modeling a library web site redesign process: developing a user-centered web site through usability testing 

This article presents a model for creating a strong, user-centered web presence by pairing usability testing and the design process. Four rounds of usability testing were conducted throughout the process of building a new academic library web site. Participants were asked to perform tasks using a talk-aloud protocol. Tasks were based on guiding principles of web usability that served as a framework for the new site. Results from this study show that testing throughout the design process is an effective way to build a website that not only reflects user needs and preferences, but can be easily changed as new resources and technologies emerge.

Kathleen W. Weessies, Daniel S. Dotson

Mapping for the Masses: GIS Lite & Online Mapping Tools in Academic Libraries

Customized maps depicting complex social data are much more prevalent today than in the past. Not only in formal published outlets, interactive mapping tools make it easy to create and publish custom maps in both formal and more casual outlets such as social media. This article defines GIS Lite, describes three commercial products currently licensed by institutions and discusses issues that arise from their varied functionality and license restrictions.

Vandana Singh

Experiences of Migrating to Open Source Integrated Library Systems 

Interest in migrating to open-source integrated library systems is continually growing in libraries. Along with the interest, lack of empirical research and evidence to compare the process of migration brings a lot of anxiety to the interested librarians. In this research, twenty librarians who have worked in libraries that migrated to open-source integrated library system (ILS) or are in the process of migrating were interviewed. The interviews focused on their experiences and the lessons learned in the process of migration. The results from the interviews are used to create guidelines/best practices for each stage of the adoption process of an open-source ILS. These guidelines will be helpful for librarians who want to research and adopt an open-source ILS.

Danijela Boberic Krsticev

Information Retrieval Using Middleware Approach 

This paper explores the use of a mediator/wrapper approach to enable the search of an existing library management system using different information retrieval protocols  It proposes an architecture for a software component that will act as an intermediary between the library system and search services.It provides an overview of different approaches to add Z39.50 and Search/Retrieval via URL (SRU) functionality using a middleware approach that is implemented on the BISIS library management system. That wrapper performs transformation of Contextual Query Language (CQL) into Lucene query language. The primary aim of this software component is to enable search and retrieval of bibliographic records using the SRU and Z39.50 protocols, but the proposed architecture of the software components is also suitable for inclusion of the existing library management system into a library portal. The software component provides a single interface to server-side protocols for search and retrieval of records. Additional protocols could be used. This paper provides practical demonstration of interest to developers of library management systems and those who are trying to use open-source solutions to make their local catalog accessible to other systems.

LITA Guide: Improving the visibility and use of digital repositories through SEO

Recent OCLC surveys show that less than 2 percent of library users begin their search on a library website, which is why search engine optimization (SEO) is so crucial. And though a survey of faculty researchers at four major universities showed that most consider Google and Google Scholar amazingly effective for their research, low Google Scholar indexing ratios for library institutional repositories is widespread because it ignores common library metadata. Kenning Arlitsch and Patrick OBrien, who have presented and published widely on the topic, show how to ensure that high-value content is visible to researchers in their new book “Improving the Visibility and Use of Digital Repositories through SEO: A LITA Guide,” published by ALA TechSource. Drawing on their expertise in digital libraries and corporate marketing, they show how to mount a successful SEO strategy, including:

  • Recommended dashboards for increasing participation by sharing data;
  • Avoiding the four most common crawler errors that lead to low rankings;
  • How to effectively utilize the Google Keyword Tool;
  • The use of domain settings to generate unit-specific reports for special collections, institutional repositories and university presses.

Arlitsch is the dean of the library at Montana State University. Prior to his current position he was the associate dean for information technology services at the University of Utah’s J. Willard Marriott Library. He is the founder of the Mountain West Digital Library and the Utah Digital Newspapers program, as well as co-founder of the Western Waters Digital Library and the Western Soundscape Archive.

OBrien is the Semantic Web research director at the Montana State University Library. Prior to his current position he was the SEO research manager at the University of Utah’s J. Willard Marriott Library. He is an expert in Semantic Web technologies and their application for improving data integration quality, discovering new relationships, and turning diverse data stores into conceptual knowledge. OBrien has more than 15 years’ experience implementing data-driven marketing and risk management strategy within various industries.

ALA Store purchases fund advocacy, awareness and accreditation programs for library professionals worldwide. Contact us at (800) 545-2433 ext. 5418 or editionsmarketing (at) ala.org.

LITA Guide Available: Implementing virtual reference services

Social Web technologies present an often confusing array of options for answering library users’ reference questions. In “Implementing Virtual Reference Services: A LITA Guide,” published by ALA TechSource, editor Beth C. Thomsett-Scott applies 20 years’ experience as a reference librarian to sort through the clutter of tools and technologies in the industry. Contributors from across the field lay out how libraries are using vendor services such as LibraryH3lp, LibAnswers and Text a Librarian, as well as free tools like Twitter and Google Voice, for their reference needs. Practitioners offer details on virtual reference services such as Twitter Search, instant messaging (IM) services such as Google Voice and Chat and collaborative services such as My Info Quest.

Thomsett-Scott is currently the engineering librarian at the University of North Texas Libraries. In her previous role as reference unit manager, she assisted with establishing the libraries’ Meebo service, as well as their chat and text messaging services. She has served in various positions in professional associations, including ALA, the Special Library Association and the Texas Library Association. She has published in a variety of journals and presented conference sessions on the topics of website usability, mentoring and training reference staff and students and technology.

ALA Store purchases fund advocacy, awareness and accreditation programs for library professionals worldwide. Contact us at (800) 545-2433 ext. 5418 or editionsmarketing (at) ala.org.

Introduction to Python: Join Us in Chicago for a LITA Preconference

Are you ready to start coding? Have you made your ALA Annual travel plans yet?

The Library Code Year Interest Group (a joint ALCTS and LITA Interest Group) will be offering a full-day pre-conference workshop on Python before this year’s ALA Annual Conference in Chicago. Attendees will learn the basics of the Python programming language with ample opportunities for hands-on, project-based practice. Using a curriculum based on the one developed by the Boston Python Workshop, we will teach attendees the syntax and key features of Python while providing them with an opportunity to work through practice exercises. During the second half of the day, attendees will have the opportunity to complete a short project in Python to use the skills they have learned. Experienced teaching staff will be on hand to provide support and feedback throughout the workshop.

While we’ll cover a lot of ground, this workshop does not assume any prior programming experience. We will provide a supportive environment and explain everything you need to know through a mix of lecture, self-paced hands-on exercises, and projects. By the end of the day, attendees will be ready to tackle new projects and will have ideas about how they can integrate Python into their work going forward. Whether you have never written a program in your life or you already have experience in other languages and want to add Python to your repertoire, this workshop will be perfect for you! Come to learn a new skills and to meet like-minded individuals in a fun, welcoming setting. While Division members get a discount, you need not be a Division member to attend; we’d love to see all kinds of library staff represented! If you have any questions about the workshop, please feel free to contact Carli Spina (cspina@law.harvard.edu) for additional information. Registration and Cost Information

Please note: Attendees will be asked to bring a laptop with them to the workshop and will need to set up a Python development environment on that computer in advance. The teaching staff will offer support throughout this process, including step-by-step instructions and virtual office hours. Depending on your experience level, this may take anywhere from half an hour to a few hours.

Can’t make it to Chicago for ALA this summer? Want to start learning today? Find out other library coding projects and educational opportunities in the Library Journal Digital Shift’s post Cracking the Code: Librarians Acquiring Essential Coding Skills

December issue of ITAL Available

The December issue of Information Technology and Libraries is available at:

http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/issue/current

Issue contents are listed below. To receive automatic notifications of future issues, please subscribe to ITAL here:

https://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/notification/subscribeMailList.

Please note the the first volume of the Journal of Library Automation (JOLA), first published in 1968, is also now available online. JOLA was the predecessor to Information Technology and Libraries. Additional volumes will be published shortly.

Suggestions and feedback are always welcome: please send to Bob Gerrity, ITAL Editor, at gerrityr (at) gmail.com.

 

Information Technology and Libraries

Volume 31, Number 4 (December 2012)

CONTENTS

Editorials

 

Bob Gerrity

Editor’s Comments

http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/article/view/3012

 

Ed Tallent

Editorial Board Thoughts: Technology and Mission: Reflections of a First-Year Library Director

http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/article/view/3001

 

Articles

 

David Ward, Jim Hahn, Kirsten Feist

Autocomplete as a Research Tool: A Study on Providing Search Suggestions

http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/view/1930

As the library website and on its online searching tools become the primary “branch” many users visit for their research, methods for providing automated, context-sensitive research assistance need to be developed to guide unmediated searching towards the most relevant results. This study examines one such method, the use of autocompletion in search interfaces, by conducting usability tests on its use in typical academic research scenarios. The study reports notable findings on user preference for autocomplete features, and suggests best practices for their implementation.

 

Susan Thompson

Student Use of Library Computers: Are Desktop Computers Still Relevant in Today’s Libraries?

http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/view/2284

Academic libraries have traditionally provided computers for students to access their collections and, more recently, facilitate all aspects of studying. Recent changes in technology, particularly the increased presence of mobile devices, calls into question how libraries can best provide technology support and how it might impact the use of other library services. A two-year study conducted at California State University San Marcos library analyzed student use of the computers in the library, both the library’s own desktop computers and laptops owned by students. The results found that, despite the increased ownership of mobile technology by students, they still clearly preferred to use desktop computers in the library. It also showed that students who used computers in the library were more likely to use other library services and physical collections.

 

Victor Jesús Sosa-Sosa and Emigdio M. Hernandez-Ramirez

A File Storage Service on a Cloud Computing Environment for Digital Libraries

http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/view/1844

This paper introduces a file storage service that is implemented on a private/hybrid cloud computing environment. The entire system was implemented using open source software. The characteristic of elasticity is supported by virtualization technologies allowing to increase and to decrease the computing and storage resources based on their demand. An evaluation of performance and resource consumption was made using several levels of data availability and fault tolerance. The set of modules included in this storage environment can be taken as a reference guide for IT staff that wants to have some experience building a modest cloud storage infrastructure.

 

Eun G. Park and Sam Oh

Examining Attributes of Open Standard File Formats for Long-term Preservation and Open Access

http://ejournals.bc.edu/ojs/index.php/ital/view/1946

This study examines the attributes that have been used to assess file formats in literature and compiles the most frequently used attributes of file formats in order to establish open standard file format selection criteria. A comprehensive review was undertaken to identify the current knowledge regarding file format selection criteria. The findings indicate that the most common criteria can be categorized into five major groups: functionality, metadata, openness, interoperability, and independence. These attributes appear to be closely related. Additional attributes include presentation, authenticity, adoption, protection, preservation, reference, and others.