LITA Presents Two Webinars on Kids, Technology and Libraries

Technology and Youth Services Programs: Early Literacy Apps and More
Wednesday May 20, 2015
1:00 pm – 2:00 pm Central Time

and

After Hours: Circulating Technology to Improve Kids’ Access
Wednesday May 27, 2015
1:00 pm – 2:00 pm Central Time

Register now for either or both of these exciting and lively webinars

tweentabTechnology and Youth Services Programs, join Claire Moore, Head of Children’s Service at Darien Library (CT). In this digital age it has become increasingly important for libraries to infuse technology into their programs and services. Youth services librarians are faced with many technology routes to consider and app options to evaluate and explore. Claire will discuss innovative and effective ways the library can create opportunities for children, parents and caregivers to explore new technologies.

makeittakeitarduinoAfter Hours: Circulating Technology to Improve Kids’ Access, join Megan Egbert the Youth Services Manager for the Meridian Library District (ID). For years libraries have been providing access and training to technology through their services and programs. Kids can learn to code, build a robot, and make a movie with an iPad at the library. But what can they do when they get home? The Meridian Library (ID) has chosen to start circulating new types of technology such as Arduinos, Raspberry Pi’s, robots, iPads and apps. Join Megan to discover benefits, opportunities and best practices.

Register for either one or both of the webinars

Full details
Can’t make the date but still want to join in? Registered participants will have access to the recorded webinar.

Cost:

LITA Member: $45
Non-Member: $105
Group: $196

Registration Information

Register Online page arranged by session date (login required)
OR
Mail or fax form to ALA Registration
OR
Call 1-800-545-2433 and press 5
OR
email [email protected]

Questions or Comments?

For all other questions or comments related to the course, contact LITA at (312) 280-4269 or Mark Beatty, [email protected].

After Hours: Circulating Technology to Improve Kids’ Access

A LITA Webinar: After Hours: Circulating Technology to Improve Kids’ Access

makeittakeitarduinoWednesday May 27, 2015
1:00 pm – 2:00 pm Central Time
Register now for this webinar

The second brand new LITA Webinar on youth and technology.

For years libraries have been providing access and training to technology through their services and programs. Kids can learn to code, build a robot, and make a movie with an iPad at the library. But what can they do when they get home? How can libraries expand their reach to help more than just the youth they see every day? The Meridian Library (ID) has chosen to start circulating new types of technology. Want to learn about Arduinos? Check one out from our library! What is a Raspberry Pi? You get 4 weeks to figure it out. Robots too expensive to buy? Too many iPad apps to choose from? Test it from your library first. Join Megan Egbert to discover benefits, opportunities and best practices.

MeganegbertMegan Egbert

Is the Youth Services Manager for the Meridian Library District (ID), where she oversees programs and services for ages 0-18. Previous to her three years in this position she was a Teen Librarian. She earned her Masters in Library Science from the University of North Texas and her Bachelors in Sociology from Boise State University. Her interests include STEAM education, digital badges, makerspaces, using apps in storytime, and fostering digital literacy. @MeganEgbert on Twitter

Then register for the webinar

Full details
Can’t make the date but still want to join in? Registered participants will have access to the recorded webinar.
Cost:

LITA Member: $45
Non-Member: $105
Group: $196
Registration Information

Register Online page arranged by session date (login required)
OR
Mail or fax form to ALA Registration
OR
Call 1-800-545-2433 and press 5
OR
email [email protected]

Questions or Comments?

For all other questions or comments related to the course, contact LITA at (312) 280-4269 or Mark Beatty, [email protected].

Technology Disaster Response and Recovery Planning

Mallery_300Check out the newest LITA Guide: Technology Disaster Response and Recovery Planning

Most library disaster plans focus on response and recovery from collection and facilities disasters, such as fire and floods. But because technology is becoming ever more integral to libraries’ role in their communities, any interruption in service and resources is a serious matter. A disaster’s effect on internet and social media sites, electronic resources, digital collections, and staff and public infrastructure of PCs, tablets, laptops and other peripherals requires special consideration. Edited by Mary Mallery, “Technology Disaster Response and Recovery Planning: A LITA Guide” published by ALA TechSource, features contributions from librarians who offer hard-won advice gained from personal experience. Leading readers through a step-by-step process of creating a library technology disaster response and recovery plan, this compendium:

  • outlines the three phases of technology disaster response, with examples of planning and implementation strategies from several different libraries;
  • describes how to conduct an inventory and risk assessment;
  • provides detailed case studies of recent large-scale technology disasters in libraries and documents how lessons learned have helped to improve technology disaster planning;
  • offers an in-depth look at future trends in cloud computing, mapping out the new field of disaster mitigation, response and recovery planning;
  • includes useful resources such as checklists, templates and a sample communications plan.

Mallery is the associate dean for technical services at Montclair State University Library. She has published articles and presented on library technology-related topics extensively. She is the book review editor for the Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship and a regular contributor to the Web Review column of Technical Services Quarterly. She teaches classes in database design and management as well as metadata sources for library professionals at the Rutgers University School of Communication and Information as a part-time lecturer.

Technology and Youth Services Programs

Technology and Youth Services Programs: Early Literacy Apps and More

tweentabWednesday May 20, 2015
1:00 pm – 2:00 pm Central Time
Register now for this webinar

A brand new LITA Webinar on youth and technology.

In this digital age it has become increasingly important for libraries to infuse technology into their programs and services. Youth services librarians are faced with many technology routes to consider and app options to evaluate and explore. Join Claire Moore from the Darien Public Library to discuss innovative and effective ways the library can create opportunities for children, parents and caregivers to explore new technologies.

clairemooreClaire Moore

Is the Head of Children’s Services at Darien Library in Connecticut. She is a member of ALSC’s School Age Programs and Services Committee and the Digital Content Task Force. Claire earned her Masters in Library and Information Science at Pratt Institute in New York. Claire currently lives in Brooklyn, NY.

Then register for the webinar

Full details
Can’t make the date but still want to join in? Registered participants will have access to the recorded webinar.
Cost:

LITA Member: $45
Non-Member: $105
Group: $196
Registration Information

Register Online page arranged by session date (login required)
OR
Mail or fax form to ALA Registration
OR
Call 1-800-545-2433 and press 5
OR
email [email protected]

Questions or Comments?

For all other questions or comments related to the course, contact LITA at (312) 280-4269 or Mark Beatty, [email protected].

LITA Lightning Rounds at 2015 ALA Annual

litaLT15Will you be at the American Library Association Conference in San Francisco this June? Do you have a great new technology idea that you’d like to share informally with colleagues? How about a story related to a clever tech project that you just pulled off at your institution, successfully, or less-than-successfully?

The LITA Program Planning Committee (PPC) is now accepting proposals for a round of Lightning Talks to be given at ALA.

To submit your idea please fill out this form: http://goo.gl/4NbBY2

The lightning rounds will be Saturday June 27, 10:30 – 11:30

All presenters will be given 5 minutes to speak.

Proposals are due Monday, May 4 at midnight. Questions? Please contact PPC chair, Debra Shapiro, [email protected]

Thanks!

Creating Better Tutorials Through User-Centered Instructional Design

guidanceA LITA Preconference at 2015 ALA Annual

Register online for the ALA Annual Conference and add a LITA Preconference

Friday, June 26, 2015, 8:30am – 4:00pm

Have you wanted to involve users as you design interactive e-learning, but aren’t sure where to start? In this unique, hands-on workshop, you will learn the core and emerging principles of instructional and user experience design and apply what you have learned to design, develop, and test a tutorial you create. The three dynamic and experienced workshop facilitators will cover topics including design thinking, user-centered pedagogy, user interface prototyping, and intercept usability testing while providing hands-on practice in each area.

Check out these 3 tutorials examples:

Popular vs. Scholarly Sources
Academic Search Complete
Locating Manuscripts in Special Collections

Presenters:

meryYvonne Mery, Instructional Design Librarian, University of Arizona

Yvonne co-authored the book, Online by Design: the Essentials of Creating Information Literacy Courses. She has co-authored several papers on the integration of information literacy in online classes and presented at numerous national conferences on best practices for online information literacy instruction.

blakistonrRebecca Blakiston, User Experience Librarian, University of Arizona Libraries

Rebecca has been at the University of Arizona Libraries since 2008, and the website product manager since 2010. She provides oversight, management, and strategic planning for the library website, specializing in guerilla usability testing, writing for the web, and content strategy. She developed a process for in-house usability testing, which has been implemented successfully both within website projects and in an ongoing, systematic way. She has authored, Usability Testing: a Practical Guide for Librarians.

sultLeslie Sult, Associate Librarian, University of Arizona

Leslie is in the Research and Learning department. Her work is focused on developing and improving scalable teaching models that enable the library to reach and support many more students than was possible earlier through traditional one-shot instructional sessions. With Gregory Hagedon, Leslie won the ACRL Instruction Section Innovation Award in 2013 for their work on the software Guide on the Side, which helps instruction librarians create tutorials for database instruction.

Guide on the Side

“Understanding that many librarians are feeling the pressure to find methods to support student learning that do not require direct, librarian-led instruction, the University of Arizona Library’s Guide on the Side provides an excellent tutorial grounded in sound pedagogy that could significantly change the way libraries teach students how to use databases,” said award committee co-chairs, Erin L. Ellis of the University of Kansas and Robin Kear of the University of Pittsburgh. “The creators have made a version of the software open access and freely available to librarians to quickly create online, interactive tutorials for database instruction. This allows librarians to easily create tutorials that are both engaging to students and pedagogically sound. Guide on the Side serves as a model of the future of library instruction.”

AC15sfPod238x120Registration:

Rates

  • LITA Member $235
  • ALA Member $350
  • Non-Member $380

How-to

To register for any of these events, you can include them with your initial conference registration or add them later using the unique link in your email confirmation. If you don’t have your registration confirmation handy, you can request a copy by emailing [email protected]. You also have the option of registering for a preconference only. To receive the LITA member pricing during the registration process on the Personal Information page enter the discount promotional code: LITA2015

Register online for the ALA Annual Conference and add a LITA Preconference
Call ALA Registration at 1-866-513-0760
Onsite registration will also be accepted in San Francisco.

Questions or Comments?

For all other questions or comments related to the course, contact LITA at (312) 280-4269 or Mark Beatty, [email protected]

Yes, You Can Video!

A how-to guide for creating high-impact instructional videos without tearing your hair out.

smvideoclapperTuesday May 12, 2015
1:00 pm – 2:30 pm Central Time
Register now for this webinar

This brand new LITA Webinar promises a fun time learning how to create instructional videos

Have you ever wanted to create an engaging and educational instructional video, but felt like you didn’t have the time, ability, or technology? Are you perplexed by all the moving parts that go into creating an effective tutorial? In this session, Anne Burke and Andreas Orphanides will help to demystify the process, breaking it down into easy-to-follow steps, and provide a variety of technical approaches suited to a range of skill sets. They will cover choosing and scoping your topic, scripting and storyboarding, producing the video, and getting it online. They will also address common pitfalls at each stage.

Join

anneburkeAnne Burke
Undergraduate Instruction & Outreach Librarian
North Carolina State University Libraries

and

andreasorphanidesAndreas Orphanides
Librarian for Digital Technologies and Learning
North Carolina State University Libraries

Then register for the webinar

videobuttonsFull details
Can’t make the date but still want to join in? Registered participants will have access to the recorded webinar.
Cost:

LITA Member: $45
Non-Member: $105
Group: $196
Registration Information

Register Online page arranged by session date (login required)
OR
Mail or fax form to ALA Registration
OR
Call 1-800-545-2433 and press 5
OR
email [email protected]

Questions or Comments?

For all other questions or comments related to the course, contact LITA at (312) 280-4269 or Mark Beatty, [email protected].

filmstripe

Librarians, Take the Struggle Out of Statistics

statisticsrandomCheck out the brand new LITA web course:
Taking the Struggle Out of Statistics 

Instructor: Jackie Bronicki, Collections and Online Resources Coordinator, University of Houston.

Offered: April 6 – May 3, 2015
A Moodle based web course with asynchronous weekly lectures, tutorials, assignments, and group discussion.

Register Online, page arranged by session date (login required)

Recently, librarians of all types have been asked to take a more evidence-based look at their practices. Statistics is a powerful tool that can be used to uncover trends in library-related areas such as collections, user studies, usability testing, and patron satisfaction studies. Knowledge of basic statistical principles will greatly help librarians achieve these new expectations.

This course will be a blend of learning basic statistical concepts and techniques along with practical application of common statistical analyses to library data. The course will include online learning modules for basic statistical concepts, examples from completed and ongoing library research projects, and also exercises accompanied by practice datasets to apply techniques learned during the course.

Got assessment in your title or duties? This brand new web course is for you!

Here’s the Course Page

Jackie Bronicki’s background is in research methodology, data collection and project management for large research projects including international dialysis research and large-scale digitization quality assessment. Her focus is on collection assessment and evaluation and she works closely with subject liaisons, web services, and access services librarians at the University of Houston to facilitate various research projects.

libstatsDate:
April 6, 2015 – May 3, 2015

Costs:

  • LITA Member: $135
  • ALA Member: $195
  • Non-member: $260

Technical Requirements

Moodle login info will be sent to registrants the week prior to the start date. The Moodle-developed course site will include weekly asynchronous lectures and is composed of self-paced modules with facilitated interaction led by the instructor. Students regularly use the forum and chat room functions to facilitate their class participation. The course web site will be open for 1 week prior to the start date for students to have access to Moodle instructions and set their browser correctly. The course site will remain open for 90 days after the end date for students to refer back to course material.

Registration Information

Register Online page arranged by session date (login required)
OR
Mail or fax form to ALA Registration
OR
Call 1-800-545-2433 and press 5
OR
email [email protected]

Questions or Comments?

For all other questions or comments related to the course, contact LITA at (312) 280-4269 or Mark Beatty, [email protected].

LITA Webinar: Beyond Web Page Analytics

Or how to use Google tools to assess user behavior across web properties.

analyticssmallTuesday March 31, 2015
11:00 am – 12:30 pm Central Time
Register now for this webinar

This brand new LITA Webinar shows how Marquette University Libraries have installed custom tracking code and meta tags on most of their web interfaces including:

  • CONTENTdm
  • Digital Commons
  • Ebsco EDS
  • ILLiad
  • LibCal
  • LibGuides
  • WebPac, and the
  • General Library Website

The data retrieved from these interfaces is gathered into Google’s

  • Universal Analytics
  • Tag Manager, and
  • Webmaster Tools

When used in combination these tools create an in-depth view of user behavior across all these web properties.

webpageanalyticsFor example Google Tag Manager can grab search terms which can be related to a specific collection within Universal Analytics and related to a particular demographic. The current versions of these tools make systems setup an easy process with little or no programming experience required. Making sense of the volume of data retrieved, however, is more difficult.

  • How does Google data compare to vendor stats?
  • How can the data be normalized using Tag Manager?
  • Can this data help your organization make better decisions?

Continue reading LITA Webinar: Beyond Web Page Analytics

ALA Midwinter 2015 LITA Preconference Review: How User Testing Can Improve the User Experience of Your Library Website

Editor’s note: This is a guest post by Tammi Owens

Last July, Winona State University’s Darrell W. Krueger Library rolled out a completely new website. This January we added to that new user experience by upgrading to LibGuides and LibAnswers v2. Now, we’re looking for continuous improvement through continuous user experience (UX) testing. Although I have some knowledge of the history and general tenets of user experience and website design, I signed up for this LITA pre-conference to dive into some case studies and ask specific questions of UX specialists. I hoped to come away with a concrete plan or framework for UX testing at our library. Specifically, I wanted to know how to implement the results of UX testing on our website.

The instructors

Kate Lawrence is the Vice President of User Research at EBSCO. Deirdre Costello is the Senior User Experience Researcher at EBSCO. I was a little nervous this seminar was going to be surreptitious vendor marketing, but there was no EBSCO marketing at all. Kate brought decades of experience in the user research sector to our conversations, and Dierdre, as a recent MLIS with library experience, was able to connect the dots between research and practice.

The session

There were six participants in our session, with a mix of public and university libraries represented. Participants who attended the session are at all stages of website redesign and have different levels of control over our institutional websites. Some of us report to committees, while others have complete ownership of their library’s site. As in the Python pre-conference, participant experience levels were mixed.

The session was divided into four main sections: “Why usability matters,” “Website best practices,” “Usability: Process,” and an overview of UserTesting.com, a company EBSCO uses during their research. Kate and Deirdre presented each section with a slide deck, but interspersed videos and discussion into their formal presentation.

The introductions to usability and website best practices were review for me, but offered enough additional information and examples that I continued to be engaged throughout the morning. Some memorable moments for me were watching and discussing Steve Krug’s usability demo, and visiting two websites: readability-score.com and voiceandtone.com.

After lunch, Kate went step-by-step through a typical usability testing process in her department. She has nine steps in her process (yes, nine!), but after she explained each step it somehow went from overwhelming and scary to doable and exciting.

After another break, Kate and Deirdre invited Sadaf Ahmed in to speak about the company UserTesting.com. Unfortunately, this was less hands-on than I expected it to be, but I was gobsmacked by the information that could be gleaned quickly using the tool. (In short: students use Google a lot more than I ever imagined.)

At the end of the day, Kate and Deirdre set aside time for us to create research questions with which to begin our UX testing. By that time, though, everyone was overloaded with new information and we all agreed we’d rather go home, apply our knowledge, and contact Kate and Deirdre directly for feedback.

Further study

To make sure we could implement user testing at our own institutions, Kate and Deirdre distributed USB drives filled with research plans, presentations, and reports. If they referenced it during the day, it went on our USB drives. This is proving to be beneficial as I make sense of my own notes from the session and begin the research plan for our first major UX test. Additionally, Kate ordered several books for all attendees to read in the coming weeks. These items alone, along with the new network we created among attendees during the day, may be the most valuable part of the session going forward.

Review in a nutshell

This pre-conference was, for me, well worth the time and money to attend. The case studies we discussed contributed to my understanding of how to ask small questions about our website in order to make a big impact on user experience. I left with exactly the tools I desired: a framework for user testing implementation, and connections to colleagues who are willing to help us make it happen at Winona State.

Tammi Owens is the Emerging Services and Liaison Librarian at Winona State University in Winona, MN. Along with being a liaison to three academic departments, her position at the library means she often coordinates technical projects and gets to play with cool toys. Find her on Twitter (@tammi_owens) during conferences and over email ([email protected]) otherwise.