Creative Commons Crash Course, a LITA webinar

Attend this interesting and useful LITA webinar:

cc.logo.largeCreative Commons Crash Course

Wednesday, October 7, 2015
1:30 pm – 3:00 pm Central Time
Register Online, page arranged by session date (login required)

Since the first versions were released in 2002, Creative Commons licenses have become an important part of the copyright landscape, particularly for organizations that are interested in freely sharing information and materials. Participants in this 90 minute webinar will learn about the current Creative Commons licenses and how they relate to copyright law.

This webinar will follow up on Carli Spina’s highly popular Ignite Session at the 2015 ALA Mid Winter conference. Carli will explain how to find materials that are Creative Commons-licensed, how to appropriately use such items and how to apply Creative Commons licenses to newly created materials. It will also include demonstrations of some important tools that make use of Creative Commons-licensed media. This program will be useful for librarians interested in instituting a Creative Commons licensing policy at their institutions, as well as those who are interested in finding free media for use in library materials.

Carli Spina

CarliSpinaHeadshot2Is the Emerging Technologies and Research Librarian at the Harvard Law School Library. There she is responsible for teaching research and technology classes, as well as working on technology projects and creating online learning objects. She has presented both online and in-person on copyright and technology topics. Carli also offers copyright training and assistance to patrons and staff and maintains a guide to finding and understanding Creative Commons and public domain materials. Prior to becoming a librarian, she worked as an attorney at an international law firm. You can find more information about her work, publications, and presentations at

Register for the Webinar

Full details
Can’t make the date but still ant to join in? Registered participants will have access to the recorded webinar.


  • LITA Member: $45
  • Non-Member: $105
  • Group: $196

Registration Information:

Register Online, page arranged by session date (login required)
Mail or fax form to ALA Registration
call 1-800-545-2433 and press 5
email [email protected]

Questions or Comments?

For all other questions or comments related to the course, contact LITA at (312) 280-4268 or Mark Beatty, [email protected]

Teaching Patrons About Privacy, a LITA webinar

Attend this important new LITA webinar:

macrinalockTeaching Patrons about Privacy in a World of Pervasive Surveillance: Lessons from the Library Freedom Project

Tuesday October 6, 2015
1:30 pm – 3:00 pm Central Time
Register Online, page arranged by session date (login required)

In the wake of Edward Snowden’s revelations about NSA and FBI dragnet surveillance, Alison Macrina started the Library Freedom Project as a way to teach other librarians about surveillance, privacy rights, and technology tools that protect privacy. In this 90 minute webinar, she’ll talk about the landscape of surveillance, the work of the LFP, and some strategies you can use to protect yourself and your patrons online. Administrators, instructors, librarians and library staff of all shapes and sizes will learn about the important work of the Library Freedom Project and how they can help their patrons.

Alison’s work for the Library Freedom Project and classes for patrons including tips on teaching patron privacy classes can be found at:

Alison Macrina

alisonmacrinaIs a librarian, privacy rights activist, and the founder and director of the Library Freedom Project, an initiative which aims to make real the promise of intellectual freedom in libraries by teaching librarians and their local communities about surveillance threats, privacy rights and law, and privacy-protecting technology tools to help safeguard digital freedoms. Alison is passionate about connecting surveillance issues to larger global struggles for justice, demystifying privacy and security technologies for ordinary users, and resisting an internet controlled by a handful of intelligence agencies and giant multinational corporations. When she’s not doing any of that, she’s reading.

Register for the Webinar

Full details
Can’t make the date but still ant to join in? Registered participants will have access to the recorded webinar.


  • LITA Member: $45
  • Non-Member: $105
  • Group: $196

Registration Information:

Register Online, page arranged by session date (login required)
Mail or fax form to ALA Registration
call 1-800-545-2433 and press 5
email [email protected]

Questions or Comments?

For all other questions or comments related to the course, contact LITA at (312) 280-4268 or Mark Beatty, [email protected]

Putting Pen to Paper

Back in January, The Atlantic ran an article on a new device being used at the Cooper Hewitt design museum in New York City. This device allows museum visitors to become curators of their own collections, saving information about exhibits to their own special account they can access via computer after they leave. This device is called a pen; Robinson Meyer, the article’s author, likens it to a “gray plastic crayon the size of a turkey baster”. I think it’s more like a magic wand.

description of how the Cooper Hewitt pen can interact with museum exhibits
Courtesy of the Cooper Hewitt Museum website

Not only can you use the pen to save information you think is cool, you can also interact with the museum at large: in the Immersion Room, for example, you can draw a design with your pen and watch it spring to life on the walls around you. In the Process Lab, you use the pen to solve real-life design problems. As Meyer puts it, “The pen does something that countless companies, organizations, archives, and libraries are trying to do: It bridges the digital and the physical.”

The mention of libraries struck me: how could something like the Cooper Hewitt pen be used in your average public library?

The first thing that came to my mind was RFID. In my library, we use RFID to tag and label our materials. There are currently RFID “wands” that, when waved over stacks, can help staff locate books they thought were missing.

But let’s turn that around: give the patron the wand – rather, the pen – and program in a subject they’re looking for…say, do-it-yourself dog grooming. As the patron wanders, the pen is talking with the stacks via RFID asking where those materials would be. Soon the pen vibrates and a small LED light shines on the materials. Eureka!

Or, just as the Cooper Hewitt allows visitors to build their own virtual collection online, we can have patrons build their own virtual libraries. Using the same RFID scanning technology as before, patrons can link items to their library card number that they’ve already borrowed or maybe want to view in the future. It could be a system similar to Goodreads (or maybe even link it to Goodreads itself) or it could be a personal website that only the user – not the library – has access to.

What are some ways you might be able to use this tech in your library system?

Get Involved in the National Digital Platform for Libraries

Editor’s note: This is a guest post by Emily Reynolds and Trevor Owens.

Recently IMLS has increased its focus on funding digital library projects through the lens of our National Digital Platform strategic priority area. The National Digital Platform is the combination of software applications, social and technical infrastructure, and staff expertise that provides library content and services to all users in the U.S… in other words, it’s the work many LITA members are already doing!

Participants at IMLS Focus: The National Digital Platform
Participants at IMLS Focus: The National Digital Platform

As libraries increasingly use digital infrastructure to provide access to digital content and resources, there are more and more opportunities for collaboration around the tools and services that they use to meet their users’ needs. It is possible for each library in the country to leverage and benefit from the work of other libraries in shared digital services, systems, and infrastructure. We’re looking at ways to maximize the impact of our funds by encouraging collaboration, interoperability, and staff training. We are excited to have this chance to engage with and invite participation from the librarians involved in LITA in helping to develop and sustain this national digital platform for libraries.

National Digital Platform convening report
National Digital Platform convening report

Earlier this year, IMLS held a meeting at the DC Public Library to convene stakeholders from across the country to identify opportunities and gaps in existing digital library infrastructure nationwide. Recordings of those sessions are now available online, as is a summary report published by OCLC Research. Key themes include:

Continue reading Get Involved in the National Digital Platform for Libraries

LITA 2015 Scholarships Winners

Rachel Vacek announced at her LITA President’s program at the ALA Annual Conference in San Francisco, the winners of annual scholarships LITA sponsors jointly with three organizations: Baker & Taylor, LSSI and OCLC. These scholarships are for master’s level study, with an emphasis on library technology and/or automation, at a library school program accredited by the American Library Association. LITA, the Library and Information Technology Association, is a division of the American Library Association.

Andrew Meyer
Andrew Meyer

This year’s winner of the LITA/Christian Larew Memorial Scholarship ($3,000) sponsored by Baker & Taylor is Andrew Meyer who will pursue his studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The LITA/LSSI Minority Scholarship ($2,500) winner is Jesus Espinoza who will pursue his studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign. Young-In Kim, the winner of the LITA/OCLC Minority Scholarship ($3,000), will pursue her studies at Syracuse University.

Jesus Espinoza

Criteria for the scholarships include previous academic excellence, evidence of leadership potential and a commitment to a career in library automation and information technology. Two of the scholarships, the LITA/LSSI Minority Scholarship and LITA/OCLC Minority Scholarship, also require U.S Citizenship and membership in one of four minority groups: American Indian or Alaskan Native, Asian or Pacific Islander, African-American, or Hispanic.

About LITA

Young-In Kim
Young-In Kim

Established in 1966, the Library and Information Technology Association is the leading organization reaching out across types of libraries to provide education and services for a broad membership. The membership includes new professionals, web services librarians, systems librarians, digital initiatives librarians, library administrators, library schools, vendors and anyone else interested in leading edge technology and applications for librarians and information providers.

For more information, visit

LITA at ALA Annual, give us your opinions

AC15_logo_FINAL_150px_revDid you attend the 2015 ALA Annual conference in San Francisco?

Thank you! There were loads of dynamic, useful and fun LITA programming at the conference. Now we want your opinions. Please complete our

LITA at ALA Annual conference survey!

LITA programs included:

  • 3 preconferences
  • Sunday afternoon with LITA inlcuding the Top Technology Trends panel
  • Rachel Vacek’s presidents program with Lou Rosenfeld
  • A total of 20 programs
  • LITA Interest Groups discussions and meetings

You can review the LITA Highlights page for information on LITA programs and activities at Annual Conference, with the link to the full conference scheduler, and check out the LITA Interest Groups special managed discussions list too.

We’re trying very hard to make sure LITA programming meets your needs. To help us we have an

Evaluation Survey for all LITA Programs at 2015 ALA Annual conference.

Now that you attended Annual we hope you’ll take the few minutes to complete the survey. The results can have a direct effect on future programming from LITA.

Question or Comments?

For questions or comments contact Mark Beatty, LITA Programs and Marketing Specialist at [email protected] or (312) 280-4268.

LITA Updates, June 2015

This is one of our periodic messages sent to all LITA members. This update includes information about the following:

  • Election Results
  • Learning Opportunities at Annual Conference
  • Annual Conference Highlights
  • LITA Executive Director Plans to Retire

Election Results

Please join in congratulating the newly elected LITA Board Members:

Aimee Fifarek, Vice-President/President-Elect,
Ken Varnum and Susan Sharpless Smith, Directors-at-Large for three-year terms.

Thanks go to the Nominating Committee which included Karen G. Schneider, chair, Pat Ensor, Adriene Lim, and, Chris Evjy, members.

LITA members elected to the ALA Council include: Eric Suess and Joan Weeks, Councilors-at-Large.

Congratulations to all, and, thank you to every candidate who was willing to stand for office.

AC15_logo_FINAL_150px_revLearning Opportunities at Annual Conference

Three full day workshops are being offered in San Francisco on Friday, June 26th. Two of the sessions are in the Moscone Convention Center; the third preconference is off site in a maker/hacker space. These are your choices:

  1. Creating Better Tutorials Through User-Centered Instructional Design. Hands-on workshop with experts from the University of Arizona. Moscone Convention Center 2008 (W)
  2. Learn to Teach Coding and Mentor Technology Newbies – in Your Library or Anywhere! Work with experts from the Black Girls CODE to become master technology teachers. Moscone Convention Center 2010 (W)
  3. Build a Circuit & Learn to Program an Arduino in a Silicon Valley Hackerspace. This workshop will convene at Noisebridge, 2169 Mission Street, a hacker space in San Francisco. Clearly, it will be hands on.

To register for one of these three LITA workshops simply go to the ALA Annual Conference registration and sign up. If you are already registered for conference, the workshop will be added to your registration. If you can’t attend the Annual Conference but a full day workshop on Friday, June 26th from 8:30 – 4:00 pm would be perfect for you, please go to the ALA Annual Conference registration site and sign up. Although you register for these full day workshops through the Annual Conference registration site, please note: you do not have to register for the entire conference in order to register for a workshop. Registration will be accepted on site outside the classrooms for the two workshops in the Moscone Center.

  • Register online through June 19
  • Call ALA Registration at 1-800-974-3084
  • Onsite registration will also be accepted in San Francisco.

Be sure to watch the LITA web sites for announcements about online learning opportunities that are being developed for July and August.

Annual Conference Highlights

The Open House on Friday, June 26, from 3:00 to 4:00pm, MCC-2005 (W), provides members and non-members alike an opportunity to explore with the LITA leadership the many opportunities within LITA. If there is a Committee or an Interest Group that might provide you with the leadership experience you are seeking, this is the perfect time to get some f2f advice. If you have ideas about how LITA might serve you better, this is the perfect time to share those ideas. If you are interested in programming or publications, if you are looking for people who share your interests in various aspects of technology, and/or if you are seeking a good conversation with engaged members, then you will want to attend the Open House.

“Sunday Afternoon with LITA” is scheduled for the Moscone Convention Center, 3014-3016 (W). The Afternoon starts with the popular Top Technology Trends program on June 28th from 1:00 to 2:00pm. This program features our ongoing roundtable discussion about trends and advances in library technology. The panel of experts includes: Carson Block, Andrea Davis, Grace Dunbar, Bonnie Tijerina, and Sarah Houghton, moderator.

A brief awards program at 3:00 will be followed by the LITA President’s Program. The award winners include:

  • Ed Summers, Frederick G. Kilgour Award for Research in Library and Information Technology,
  • David Walker, LITA/Library Hi Tech Award for Outstanding Communication in Library and Information Technology,
  • Heather Terrell, LITA/Ex Libris Student Writing Award for her paper “Reference is dead, long live reference: electronic collections in the digital age.”

Following the awards ceremony, you will want to stay for Rachel Vacek’s President’s Program with Lou Rosenfeld, Rosenfeld Media, which publishes some of the best-loved books in user experience, produces UX events, and equips UX teams with coaching and training.

The Top Technology Trends program, LITA awards ceremony, and LITA President’s Program are all in the same room.

At 5:30, we transition from afternoon to evening at the LITA Happy Hour at DaDa Bar, 86 2nd Street.

LITA provides 20 programs at Annual Conference. Be sure to review the LITA Highlights page for detailed information on all LITA programs and activities planned for Annual Conference.

LITA Executive Director plans to retire

I have good news to share. After 24 years with ALA (14 of those with LITA), over 10 years with OCLC, and various other employment, I plan to retire. My last day will be July 31, 2015. I’m very excited. I’ve had a number of recommendations on what to do including: “spend the first day in your PJs”, and, “really enjoy not working”. I do plan to enjoy not working. I have a number of projects and plans I’ll be exploring, plus, people and places I hope to visit.

If you are in the San Francisco area on Sunday, June 28th, please come to the LITA Happy Hour to celebrate with me and the Membership Development Committee and other LITA leaders and members. The Happy Hour/Party is at the DaDa Bar, 86 2nd Street.

Hope to see you in San Francisco.

I encourage you to connect with LITA by:

  1. Exploring our web site.
  2. Subscribing to LITA-L email discussion list.
  3. Visiting the LITA blog and LITA Division page on ALA Connect.
  4. Connecting with us on Facebook and Twitter.
  5. Reaching out to the LITA leadership at any time.

Please note: the Information Technology and Libraries (ITAL) journal is available to you and to the entire profession. ITAL features high-quality articles that undergo rigorous peer-review as well as case studies, commentary, and information about topics and trends of interest to the LITA community and beyond. Be sure to sign up for notifications when new issues are posted (March, June, September, and December).

If you have any questions or wish to discuss any of these items, please do let me know.

All the best,


Mary Taylor, Executive Director
Library and Information Technology Association (LITA)
50 E. Huron, Chicago, IL 60611
800-545-2433 x4267
312-280-4267 (direct line)
312-280-3257 (fax)
mtaylor (at)

Join us in Minneapolis, November 12-15, 2015 for the LITA Forum.

Congratulations to the LITA UX Contest Winners

The results are in for LITA’s Contest: Great Library UX Ideas Under $100. Congratulations to winner Conny Liegl, Designer for Web, Graphics and UX at the Robert E. Kennedy Library at California Polytechnic State University for her submission entitled Guerilla Sketch-A-Thon. The LITA President’s Program Planning Team who ran the contest and reviewed the submissions loved how creative the project was and how it engaged users. From the sketches that accompanied the submission, and from looking at the before and after screenshots of the library website, it was clear the designers incorporated ideas from the student sketches.

Conny won a personal one-year, online subscription to Library Technology Reports, generously donated by ALA Tech Source. She gets to have lunch with LITA President Rachel Vacek and the LITA President’s Program speaker and UX expert Lou Rosenfeld at ALA in San Francisco. She gets a free book generously donated from Rosenfeld Media. And finally, her winning submission will be published in in Weave, an open-access, peer-reviewed journal for Library User Experience professionals published by Michigan Publishing.

There were so many entries submitted for the contest, picking a single winner was difficult. The Planning Team unanimously agreed to recognize first and second runner-up entries.

The First Runner-Up was the team at the University of Arizona Libraries who submitted their project Wayfinding in the Library. The team included people from multiple departments in their library including the User Experience department, Access & Information Services, and Library Communications. Congrats to Rebecca Blakiston, User Experience Librarian, Shoshana Mayden, Content Strategist, Nattawan Wood, Administrative Associate, Aungelique Rodriguez, Library Communications Student Assistant, and Beau Smith, Usability Testing Student Assistant. Each team member gets a book from Rosenfeld Media.

The Second Runner-Up was the team from Purdue University Libraries who submitted their project Applying Hierarchal Task Analysis Method to Discovery Tool Evaluation. The team consisted of Tao Zhang, Digital User Experiences Specialist and Marlen Promann, Graduate Research Assistant. Each team member gets a book from Rosenfeld Media.

In the coming months, interviews with the winners from each institution will be posted to the blog.

LITA Annual Report, 2014-2015

statswinnersmembershipAs we reflect on 2014-2015, it’s fair to say that LITA, despite some financial challenges, has had numerous successes and remains a thriving organization. Three areas – membership, education, and publications – bring in the most revenue for LITA. Of those, membership is the largest money generator. However, membership has been on a decline, a trend that’s been seen across the American Library Association (ALA) for the past decade. In response, the Board, committees, interest groups, and many and individuals have been focused on improving the member experience to retain current members and attract potential ones. With all the changes to the organization and leadership, LITA is on the road to becoming profitable again and will remain one of ALA’s most impactful divisions.

Read more in the LITA Annual Report.

Create, Build, Code and Hack with a choice of 4 LITA preconferences

Register now for one of four exciting LITA pre conferences at 2015 ALA Annual in San Francisco.

On Friday, June 26, at the 2015 ALA Annual Conference in San Francisco, the Library and Information Technology Association (LITA) brings you a choice of 4 dynamic, useful and fun preconferences. These all-day preconferences, 8:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m., will teach you how to create, build, code and hack the newest trends in technology for libraries. Register through the 2015 ALA Annual Conference website. The price to register is: $235 for LITA members (use special code LITA2015); $350 for ALA members; and $380 for non-members.

Creating Better Tutorials Through User-Centered Instructional Design. Hands-on workshop with experts from the University of Arizona. Event Code: LIT1

Build a Circuit & Learn to Program an Arduino in a Silicon Valley Hackerspace: Panel of Inventors & Librarians Working Together for a More Creative Tomorrow. This workshop will convene at Noisebridge, a maker space in San Francisco. Clearly, it will be hands on. Event Code: LIT3

Learn to Teach Coding and Mentor Technology Newbies – in Your Library or Anywhere! Work with experts from the Black Girls CODE to become master technology teachers. Event Code: LIT2

Let’s Hack a Collaborative Library Website! This hands-on experience will consist of a morning in-depth introduction to the tools, followed by an afternoon building a single collaborative library website. Event Code: LIT4

Through hands on activities participants will learn to code, build, create and learn to teach others new initiatives such as video tutorials, collaborative website tools, programming languages and arduino boards. These events are intended for any librarian wanting to stretch themselves and meet their patrons in these new hands on technologies worlds.

Notable preconference presenters include: Yvonne Mery, Leslie Sult and Rebecca Blakiston from the University of Arizona Libraries; Mitch Altman of Noisebridge, Brandon (BK) Klevence of The Maker Jawn Initiative (Philadelphia, PA), Angi Chau off the Castilleja School (Palo Alto,CA), Tod Colegrove and Tara M Radniecki of the University of Nevada – Reno; Kimberly Bryant and Lake Raymond from Black Girls CODE; and Kate Bronstad, Heather J Klish of Tufts University; and Junior Tidal of the New York City College of Technology.

See the LITA conference web site for information about LITA events including details on the preconferences, the LITA Presidents program with Lou Rosenfeld, the Top Technology Trends panel, and social events.

For questions, contact Mark Beatty, LITA Programs and Marketing Specialist at [email protected] or (312) 280-4268.