An Interview with LITA Emerging Leader Annie Gaines

Annie Gaines1. Tell us about your library job.  What do you love most about it?

I am the Scholarly Communications Librarian at the University of Idaho. This is a brand new position within the library and also my first ‘real’ librarian job, so it’s been a constant learning experience. I work along with the Digital Initiatives Librarian on the various digital projects happening at the library, including building an institutional repository, creating digital collections, redesigning the library website, creating and managing open access journals, and working on VIVO (a semantic-web application we are using as a front-end to our IR). I also do some education and advocacy around copyright, author’s rights, open access, etc.

The thing I love most about this job (aside from being able to design websites in crayon – image attached) is taking an idea and bringing it into fruition. Whether it’s a digital collection of postcards with custom navigation or a new journal or database, being able to make an idea a functional, beautiful reality is really rewarding. Also I’m just really excited about increasing access to information, and designing new ways to make that information accessible to a broader audience.

2. Where do you see yourself going from here?

Having just started this career, I’m not completely sure what’s next for me. I’m very happy in my current position, and I love all of the people I work with at the University of Idaho. I think my next step will probably be to start pursing another degree to help expand my knowledge in this field, or to fulfil my dream to become a professional comic artist/graphic novelist on the side.

3. Why did you apply to be an Emerging Leader?  What are your big takeaways from the ALA-level activities so far?

I was encouraged by my mentor, a previous Emerging Leader, to apply. I am actually the fourth Emerging Leader in a row to be selected from the University of Idaho Library, so there is a lot of administrative support and encouragement for this kind of activity. The big thing I’ve learned through working with ALA is that although the organization and the sub-organizations have a massive population, it is a handful of active participants who make nearly everything happen. My goal is to become one of those change-agents at the ALA level, eventually.

4. What have you learned about LITA governance and activities so far?

I’ve learned that LITA is inclusive and active with its membership. This is a very fun organization, and I’m impressed with the discussion and activities that come out of LITA and its membership.

5. What’s your favorite LITA moment?  What would you like to do next in the organization?

My favorite LITA moment was working with Rachel Vacek and Kyle Denlinger on the Town Meeting activities at Midwinter. My favorite kind of brainstorming involves large sheets of paper and crayons (see above) and being able to do that with other LITA members was really fun.

Jobs in Information Technology: September 24

New vacancy listings are posted weekly on Wednesday at approximately 12 noon Central Time. They appear under New This Week and under the appropriate regional listing.  Postings remain on the LITA Job Site for a minimum of four weeks.

New This Week

Associate University Librarian for Digital Initiatives & Services #12153, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA

Digital Projects Librarian, Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT

E-Resources Librarian, Midwestern University, Downers Grove, IL

Learning Technologies Librarian, Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary, Austin, TX

Systems Librarian, Georgetown University,  Washington, DC

Visit the LITA Job Site for more available jobs and for information on submitting a  job posting.

New Collaborative Technology

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As an academic librarian I often hear students lamenting the struggles of working in groups. Collaborating on a project is challenging, especially when everyone is working in their own place and at their own speed. At my library we have tried to provide space where students can more easily work in groups and accomplish work together.

Our first floor is dedicated collaborative space. We have a whiteboard table, comfortable seating, the coffee shop, and it gets loud. We were looking for ways to enhance this space with more technology, but we were encountering budget limitations with many of the collaborative technology pieces we considered.

An unplanned visit to a neighboring academic library led me to discover Crestron’s AirMedia. Check it out here: http://tinyurl.com/lvqcv6y

This technology allows up to 32 people to wirelessly connect to the shared presentation. Also, up to four people can display their device on a shared screen. We had considered purchasing a large television and then buying cables, but having the capability for users to connect wirelessly was a huge selling feature for us. Also, it works with Android, iOS, and Windows. I would like to see more capabilities for tablets in the future, but this technology is just a year old and hopefully more features will be made available.

With a grant from Amigos Library Services we purchased the AirMedia device, a 55” television, and a new table and chairs that are more conducive to collaborative work than what we already had available. It is still early in the semester, but students are catching on and commenting on how “cool” it is. We have had to do some promotion, because otherwise it just looks like a big TV with a new table. Generating a list of potential uses for the technology and placing it on the wall by the station is one promotional method.

We hope to be able to purchase more collaborative technology in the future. I’d love to hear what technology others are using to help library users collaborate!

An Interview with LITA Emerging Leader Kyle Denlinger

Kyle Denlinger1. Tell us about your library job.  What do you love most about it?

My job as eLearning Librarian is equal parts project manager, instructional designer, information literacy teacher, and instructional technologist, with some multimedia producer and reference librarian thrown in to keep things interesting. My main initiative right now is the continuing development of ZSRx, my library’s series of open online courses for Wake Forest alumni and parents. What I love most about my job is that I’m empowered to act on big ideas, I get to do a bunch of creative work, and I get to do it all alongside some of the best coworkers and faculty colleagues you could find anywhere.

2. Where do you see yourself going from here?

I would *love* to eventually head up a team that serves as a resource for faculty who want to better integrate technology and library resources into their teaching in effective and creative ways. This team would handle everything from software training to multimedia production to instructional design for online, blended, and face-to-face courses.

3. Why did you apply to be an Emerging Leader?  What are your big takeaways from the ALA-level activities so far?

I applied to the EL program because so many of the people I look up to in libraries went through the program at some point in their career, and their experiences seem to have served them well. I can see why–I’ve already made some excellent ALA buddies through EL and have had a few doors open to me since being accepted to the program. My biggest takeaway so far is that decisions are made by those that show up. Big as they are, ALA, and LITA in particular, are really accessible organizations for those that wish to get involved at any level–you just have to show up and be willing to do the work.

4. What have you learned about LITA governance and activities so far?

It was great to be able to sit in on a LITA board meeting and to help plan the #becauseLITA stuff surrounding the Town Meeting at Midwinter. LITA’s emphasis on openness and camaraderie, and the fun-by-default nature of most LITA activities makes me happy that it’s my professional home. I can’t say I’m an expert on LITA governance (yet), but I do know that I’m able to be involved at even the highest levels if I so choose.

5. What’s your favorite LITA moment?  What would you like to do next in the organization?

My favorite LITA moment comes from my least-favorite LITA moment (or, rather, a LITA non-moment). At the Top Tech Trends panel at Annual in Chicago, Char Booth gave me and a project I’d been working on a very prominent shout-out in front of a full room. This was great, but it would have been even better if I’d, you know, ATTENDED THE PANEL. I’d decided to skip it to get an early dinner with a friend. I found out through a small flood of excited texts from friends who were there, and at the LITA Happy Hour that evening, almost everyone I knew was super excited for me. I think someone bought me a beer. Such is LITA.

The thing I’m excited about is getting involved in next is the shiny new User Experience IG, which everyone should join. Shameless plug: http://connect.ala.org/node/222849

LITA Members: take the LITA Education Survey

LITA members, please participate in the LITA Education Survey. The survey was first sent out 2 weeks ago to all current LITA members.  Another reminder will appear in LITA members email boxes soon, or you can click the links in this posting. The survey should take no more than 10 minutes of your time and will help your LITA colleagues developing continuing education programs to meet your needs.

LITA Education Survey 2014

In our continuing efforts to make LITA education offerings meet the needs and wishes of our membership, we ask that you, the LITA members, take a few minutes to fill out the linked survey. We are looking for information on education offerings you have participated in recently and would like to know what topics, methods and calendar times work best for you.

The more responses we get the better chances we have to create education offerings that provide excellent value to you the LITA membership. We appreciate you taking 10 minutes of your time to complete the LITA Education Survey 2014.

Thank you for your time and input.

LITA Education Committee

Taking the Edge Off of Tech

Image courtesy of Tina Franklin. Flickr 2013
Image courtesy of Tina Franklin. Flickr 2013.

E-readers and tablets have become an increasingly popular way for patrons to access digital media. Mobile technology has altered the landscape of the types of services offered to public library patrons. Digital media services and distributers (i.e. iBookstore, Audible, Overdrive and Hoopla) allow patrons to download and stream ebooks, audiobooks, video and music. After happening upon the article “Shape Up Your Skills and Shake Up Your Library,” by Marshall Breeding for Computers in Libraries, I’m reminded that information professionals in public libraries must sharpen their tech skills in order to be of advantage to their patrons. If you belong to a library that subscribes to a digital media distributor, such as Overdrive and Hoopla, you are most likely first tier technical support for issues concerning the application and the device itself. For patrons who are not familiar with tablets and e-readers, their expectation of your assistance goes beyond navigating the library’s subscription service. You may find yourself giving instruction on where to find the wireless settings or how to properly turn the device off. It is natural to become intimidated by the technology when you’re sitting with a patron desperately attempting to figure out what the issue could be.

Not all public libraries are fortunate to have e-readers and tablets to train with. In that case, I suggest looking into alternative forms of instruction. Though I cannot promise you a complete instructional, I’ll attempt to help you brush-up on the light technical skills you’ll need before having to phone the professionals.

Familiarity is key
The first step in getting a better understanding of the technology is to become familiar with the exact services that your library is subscribed to. In the case of Overdrive and Hoopla, their services can be accessed using a computer. That is a great opportunity to explore the different features of the service. Be ready to answer certain questions: Does the library offer downloadable ebooks, audiobooks or video? What formats are they available in? What devices can be used with the service? If all else fails, you can always contact the service provider and ask for training materials or frequently asked questions and answers. If not already available, you can create instructional handouts for use by colleagues and patrons.

Take advantage of free services
To add some edge to your skills, consider utilizing the live product displays at electronics stores.
• Visit the Apple Store to use their iPads, iPad mini, etc.
• Best Buy has live displays of various Android OS tablets
• Target stores often feature Kindles and iPads
• Barnes and Noble stores have Nook displays

There are a plethora of alternate stores to consider. The imperative is to root around with the technology until you’re comfortable with its features. You want to know where the settings are located for each device because that knowledge will be useful at some point. And while you’re there, don’t be afraid to ask the salesperson questions about the device’s functionality. There is a high chance you will ask a question that will later be asked of you.

I make no assumptions here. Not all libraries have access to instructional materials or handouts for patrons. My aim is to create a starting point for self-training and instruction that is free and can be passed along to colleagues and patrons.

Tech Yourself Before You Wreck Yourself – Vol. 1

Robot
Art from Cécile Graat

This post is for all the tech librarian caterpillars dreaming of one day becoming empowered tech butterflies. The internet is full to the brim with tools and resources for aiding in your transformation (and your job search). In each installment of Tech Yourself Before You Wreck Yourself – TYBYWY, pronounced tie-buy-why – I’ll curate a small selection of free courses, webinars, and other tools you can use to learn and master technologies.  I’ll also spotlight a presentation opportunity so that you can consider putting yourself out there- it’s a big, beautiful community and we all learn through collaboration.

MOOC of the Week -

Allow me to suggest you enroll in The Emerging Future: Technology Issues and Trends, a MOOC offered by the School of Information at San Jose State University through Canvas. Taking a Futurist approach to technology assessment, Sue Alman, PhD offers participants an opportunity to learn “the planning skills that are needed, the issues that are involved, and the current trends as we explore the potential impact of technological innovations.”

Sounds good to this would-be Futurist!

Worthwhile Webinars –

I live in the great state of Texas, so it is with some pride that I recommend the recurring series, Tech Tools with Tine, from the Texas State Library and Archives Commission.  If you’re like me, you like your tech talks in manageable bite-size pieces. This is just your style.

September 19th, 9-10 AM EST – Tech Tools with Tine: 1 Hour of Google Drive

September 26th, 9-10 AM EST – Tech Tools with Tine: 1 Hour of MailChimp

October 3rd, 9-10 AM EST – Tech Tools with Tine: 1 Hour of Curation with Pinterest and Tumblr

Show Off Your Stuff –

The deadline to submit a proposal to the 2015 Library Technology Conference at Macalester College in beautiful St. Paul is September 22nd. Maybe that tight timeline is just the motivation you’ve been looking for!

What’s up, Tiger Lily? -

Are you a tech caterpillar or a tech butterfly? Do you have any cool free webinars or opportunities you’d like to share? Write me all about it in the comments.

LITA Scholarships in Library and Information Science

CHICAGO — The Library and Information Technology Association (LITA), a division of the American Library Association, is pleased to announce that applications are being accepted for three Scholarships:

LITA/Christian Larew Memorial Scholarship (sponsored by Baker & Taylor)

LITA/LSSI Minority Scholarship (sponsored by Library Systems and Services, LLC)

LITA/OCLC Minority Scholarship (sponsored by Online Computer Library Center)

The scholarships are designed to encourage the entry of qualified persons into the library technology field.  The committees seek those who plan to follow a career in library and information technology, who demonstrate potential leadership, who hold a strong commitment to the use of automated systems in libraries and, for the minority scholarships, those who are qualified members of a principal minority group (American Indian or Alaskan native, Asian or Pacific Islander, African-American or Hispanic).

Candidates should illustrate their qualifications for the scholarships with a statement indicating the nature of their library experience, letters of reference and a personal statement of the applicant’s view of what he or she can bring to the profession, with particular emphasis on experiences that indicate potential for leadership and commitment to library automation.  Economic need is considered when all other criteria are equal.  Winners must have been accepted to an ALA recognized MLS Program.

You can apply for LITA scholarships through the single online application hosted by the ALA Scholarship Program. The ALA Scholarship Application Database will open Sept. 15.

References, transcripts and other documents must be postmarked no later than March 1, 2015 for consideration.  All materials should be submitted to American Library Association, Scholarship Clearinghouse, c/o Human Resource Development & Recruitment, 50 East Huron Street, Chicago, IL  60611-2795.  If you have questions about a LITA Scholarships please email the LITA Office at vedmonds@ala.org.

The winners will be announced at the LITA President’s Program at the 2015 ALA Annual Conference in San Francisco.

LITA/Library Hi Tech Award Nominations Sought

Nominations are being accepted for the 2015 LITA/Library Hi Tech Award, which is given each year to an individual or institution for outstanding achievement in educating the profession about cutting edge technology through communication in continuing education within the field of library and information technology. Sponsored by the Library and Information Technology Association (LITA), a division of the American Library Association (ALA), and Library Hi Tech, the award includes a citation of merit and a $1,000 stipend provided by Emerald Group Publishing Limited, publishers of Library Hi Tech. The deadline for nominations is December 1, 2014.

The award, given to either a living individual or an institution, may recognize a single seminal work or a body of work created during or continuing into the five years immediately preceding the award year. The body of work need not be limited to published texts, but can include course plans or actual courses and/or non-print publications such as visual media. Awards are intended to recognize living persons rather than to honor the deceased; therefore, awards are not made posthumously. More information and a list of previous winners can be found at http://www.ala.org/lita/awards/hitech in the Awards and Scholarships section.

Currently serving officers and elected officials of LITA, members of the LITA/Library Hi Tech Award Committee, and employees and their immediate family of Emerald Group Publishing are ineligible.

Nominations must include the name(s) of the recipient(s), basis for nomination, and references to the body of work.  Electronic submissions are preferred, but print submissions may also be sent to the LITA/Library Hi Tech Award Committee chair:

Holly Yu
University Library
California State University, Los Angeles
5151 State University Dr
Los Angeles, CA 90032-4226.
hyu3@calstatela.edu

The award will be presented at the LITA President’s Program during the 2015 Annual Conference of the American Library Association in San Francisco.

About Emerald

Emerald is a global publisher linking research and practice to the benefit of society. The company manages a portfolio of more than 290 journals and over 2,350 books and book series volumes. It also provides an extensive range of value-added products, resources and services to support its customers’ needs. Emerald is a partner of the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) and works with Portico and the LOCKSS initiative for digital archive preservation. It also works in close collaboration with a number of organizations and associations worldwide.  www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com

About LITA

Established in 1966, LITA is the leading organization reaching out across types of libraries to provide education and services for a broad membership of almost 3,000 system librarians, library administrators, library schools, vendors and many others interested in leading edge technology and applications for librarians and information providers. For more information, visit www.lita.org , or contact the LITA office at 800-545-2433, ext. 4268; or e-mail: lita@ala.org.

For further information, contact Mary Taylor at LITA, 312-280-4267.

Nominations Sought for Prestigious Kilgour Research Award

Nominations are invited for the 2015 Frederick G. Kilgour Award for Research in Library and Information Technology, sponsored by OCLC, Inc. and the Library and Information Technology Association (LITA), a division of the American Library Association (ALA). The deadline for nominations is December 31, 2014.

The Kilgour Research Award recognizes research relevant to the development of information technologies, in particular research showing promise of having a positive and substantive impact on any aspect of the publication, storage, retrieval and dissemination of information or how information and data are manipulated and managed. The Kilgour award consists of $2,000 cash, an award citation and an expense paid trip (airfare and two nights lodging) to the ALA Annual Conference.

Nominations will be accepted from any member of the American Library Association. Nominating letters must address how the research is relevant to libraries; is creative in its design or methodology; builds on existing research or enhances potential for future exploration; and/or solves an important current problem in the delivery of information resources. A curriculum vita and a copy of several seminal publications by the nominee must be included. Preference will be given to completed research over work in progress. More information and a list of previous winners can be found at

http://www.ala.org/lita/awards/kilgour

Currently-serving officers and elected officials of LITA, members of the Kilgour Award Committee and OCLC employees and their immediate family members are ineligible.

Send nominations by December 31, 2014, to the Award jury chair:

Tao Zhang
Purdue University Libraries
504 W State St
West Lafayette, IN 47907-4221
or zhan1022@purdue.edu

The Kilgour Research Award will be presented at the LITA President’s Program on June 29th during the 2015 ALA Annual Conference in San Francisco.

About OCLC

Founded in 1967, OCLC is a nonprofit, membership, computer library service and research organization dedicated to the public purposes of furthering access to the world’s information and reducing library costs. More than 72,000 libraries in 170 countries have used OCLC services to locate, acquire, catalog, lend, preserve and manage library materials. Researchers, students, faculty, scholars, professional librarians and other information seekers use OCLC services to obtain bibliographic, abstract and full-text information when and where they need it. For more information, visit www.oclc.org.

About LITA

LITA is the leading organization reaching out across types of libraries to provide education and services for a broad membership including systems librarians, library administrators, library schools, vendors and many others interested in leading edge technology and applications for librarians and information providers. For more information, visit www.lita.org, or contact the LITA office by phone, 800-545-2433, ext. 4268; or e-mail: lita@ala.org

For further information, contact Mary Taylor at LITA, 312-280-4267.

The Library and Information Technology Association