Category Archives: 2007

Annual conference of the American Library Association, held in Washington DC June 21-27, 2007.

Using Metadata Standards in Digital Libraries presentations

At the Annual 2007 American Library Association conference in Washington in June, the LITA Standards Interest Group sponsored a program entitled “Using Metadata Standards in Digital Libraries: implementing METS, MODS, PREMIS and MIX”. This session explored how libraries are using emerging standards to manage and provide navigation for digital library objects and featured the following:

  • Rebecca Guenther, Library of Congress: Using Metadata Standards in Digital Libraries: Introduction to METS, MODS, PREMIS and MIX
  • Morgan Cundiff, Library of Congress: Using and to Create XML Standards-based Digital Library Applications
  • Nathan Trail, Library of Congress: How to Build, Display and Find METS Objects
  • Brian Tingle, California Digital Library: Use of METS in CDL Digital Special Collections
  • Sarah Shreeves, University of Illinois Urbana/Champaign: Creating Rich Shareable Metadata: the DLF Aquifer MODS implementation guidelines
  • Tom Habing, University of Illinois Urbana/Champaign: METS, MODS and PREMIS, Oh My!: Integrating Digital Library Standards for Interoperability and Preservation
  • Tod Olson, University of Chicago: MODS as Data Hub

The Library of Congress has made the presentations available.

LITA Education Committee

The Education Committee met for the last time before merging with the Regional Institutes Committee to become the new (ta-da) Eduation Committee.

Susan Logue, as LITA board liaison, reported on the board meeting and shared information about the board’s assignments and expectations for the newly merged committee.

Included in the charge for the new committee are these points:

  1. Create 3-5 short online events
  2. Create liaisons to LITA interest groups for ideas
  3. Create an education committee wiki and supply editor for it from the committee members
  4. Create and maintain list of tools for educational initiatives
  5. Monitor delivery of 2 institutional repositories’ offerings including an evaluation tool
  6. Goal for the committee is to have two new courses per year

Discussion by all members present centered on how to fulfill these assignments, whether it was possible to do so by a volunteer committee, and where to begin. The committee agreed on the need to do the educational needs survey first.

Mark Wahrenbrock discussed his sample survey that was previously distributed to committee members. He will collect questions from the committee members and compile them into a survey that can be sent to LITA members using Survey Monkey which is available through the ALA office.

ALA Annual 2007 – LITA President’s Program

LITA podcast logoNext up in the ongoing Podcast series from ALA Annual 2007 is the LITA President’s Program, Tag! You’re IT: Online Digital Audio collections meet PennTags

This is the last of the fully-captured sessions from ALA 2007 from LITABlog, but there may still be a few pieces of audio here and there that are unearthed and posted.

As well, we have plans for LITA Forum in October, as well as ALA Midwinter…more audio to come from LITABlog! Stay tuned, and as always if you have feedback or suggestions for us, please feel free to leave a comment here on the blog.

ALA Annual 2007 – The Ultimate Debate

LITA podcast logoNext in our series of podcasts from ALA Annual 2007 is The Ultimate Debate: Do Libraries Innovate? Moderated by LITA Vice-President Andrew Pace and featuring Joseph Janes, Stephen Abrams, and K.G. Schneider talking about libraries, innovation, and a great deal more. The audio file is rather large and lengthy (clocking in at an hour and fifty minutes) but it is worth every moment…lots of thought-provoking discussion between these three excellent speakers.

Thanks go out to Joe Fisher for the recording of this program, and dealing with the troubles related to managing an over-a-gigabyte audio file. Thanks, Joe!

And now: The Ultimate Debate.

Lita ERM Interest Group

Ted Koppel raised some compelling issues during his discussions on Ebooks at the ERM Interest Group last week at ALA. In this entry ERM refers to OpenURL, A-Z list and the subscriptions module of this software. ERM software works fairly well with journal content and I believe that library online journal collections have become far more accessible with OpenURL, but how do we use our ERM systems to make Ebook content more accessible?

Koppel’s discussion raised several good questions about Ebooks and ERM. There are several management issues with Ebooks. Who supplies the cataloging/meta data? Does it come from the vendor who sells you the Ebook? How granular should the management be? Should there be restrictions at the chapter level or book level? Does the type of content determine who and what can be accessed? For example, users may only be able to access chapters for a particular text or reference book, but be able to access an entire work of fiction.

What cataloging system do we use to describe the Ebook–dublin core, MARC? Where do Ebook records reside in the Opac or the ERM, or in both systems? How is Ebook content discovered through LC subject headings or a local thesauri? How does the link resolver fit into all of this? Perhaps the link resolver can take a user to a particular paragraph or top of the chapter. How do we determine the level of granularity for accessing content?

Another management issue related to Ebooks and electronic content in general is hosting. Who host this database of content? Is it hosted locally or remotely? Who maintains the servers and performs back ups?

Koppel’s discussion raised more questions than it did answers. Given our experience in managing electronic database content, the transition to ebooks should be much easier. We know about authentication, hosting, maintenance, licensing issues, and making content accessible through OpenURL and A-Z lists. However, I’m also sure there will be unique challenges in trying to make ebook content accessible and searchable along with all the other content.

Ebooks are still in their infancy, but the experience with e-journals makes the move to ebooks much easier. I enjoyed the presentation and it did make me think about how Ebooks are similar and different from other online content, but with such a busy schedule at ALA, I haven’t had a chance to think as much about possible solutions in making Ebooks accessible. I hope to keep my notes from the session handy because I know that in the near future we will grapple more with this issue.

Copyright 101 Everything You Need to Know About Copyright But Were Afraid To Ask

A very unique session on Copyright. Instead of speakers the session was set up as a poster session. Attendees could visit the various poster sessions on Copyright and ask questions.

Topics covered included: Copyright, A Limited Statutory Monopoly by Carrie Russell, Interlibrary Loan by Patricia Ball, Electronic Reserves for Text and Media by Claire Stewart and Brice Austin; International Copyright: How Does It Work by Janice Pilch; Fair Use 101 by Marc Gartler and Dwayne Butler; Preservation and Replacement by Michael Brewer; Copyright Advisory Network (www.librarycopyright.net); Copyright Term and the Public Domain by Patrick Newell; Copyright in the Digital Age: Developing Resources for Your Academic Community by Barbara Oakley; Retaining Your Copyright: Authors Rights by Trisha Davis presented by Buckley Barrett.

It was an excellent session that presented basic information on Copyright. For those you interested in exploring Copyright more visit CAN at www.librarycopyright.net.

Public Library Technology Interest Group: Small Mid Sized Libraries Facing Tech Challenges (Discussion Q&A)

Scott Reinhart, Associate Director of Operations and Bob Kuntz (IT Manager) from Carroll County Public Library discussed the challenges a small rural library faces as it begins to provide various technologies for its’ patrons and staff. Carol County Public Library is located in a rural area in Maryland. The total population is 163,207.

A supportive director enabled many of the improvements. The library participates in a consortium with other systems such as the Health and Mental Health Hospitals. The library serves as an Internet provider (for pay) for general public. Only dial-up service is provided. WIFI is also offered to the public. There are plans to go to fiber optics in the future. The library’s ILS is Horizons and SAM is used for PC reservations. A discussion followed by attendees who also shared their various experiences and challenges with technology and libraries.

LITA Standards Interest Group program

At the Annual 2007 American Library Association conference in
Washington in June, the LITA Standards Interest Group sponsored a program
entitled “Using Metadata Standards in Digital Libraries: implementing METS,
MODS, PREMIS and MIX”. This session explored how libraries are using
emerging standards to manage and provide navigation for digital library
objects and featured the following:

* Rebecca Guenther, Library of Congress: Using Metadata
Standards in Digital Libraries: Introduction to METS, MODS, PREMIS and MIX
* Morgan Cundiff, Library of Congress: Using and to Create XML Standards-based Digital Library Applications
* Nathan Trail, Library of Congress: How to Build, Display and Find METS Objects
* Brian Tingle, California Digital Library: Use of METS in CDL Digital Special Collections
* Sarah Shreeves, University of Illinois Urbana/Champaign: Creating Rich Shareable Metadata: the DLF Aquifer MODS implementation guidelines
* Tom Habing, University of Illinois Urbana/Champaign: METS, MODS and PREMIS, Oh My!: Integrating Digital Library Standards for Interoperability and Preservation
* Tod Olson, University of Chicago: MODS as Data Hub

The Library of Congress has made the presentations available at:
http://www.loc.gov/standards/mods/presentations/litaprogram-an2007.html

Top Technology Trends – ALA Annual 2007, part 7

LITA podcast logoThe final of our Top Technology Trend podcasts from this year’s ALA Annual meeting is here! Now that all of the Trendsters have spoken their minds, we give them a chance to challenge each other and respond to the audience.

Next week, we’ll begin rolling out more podcasts from ALA Annual 2007, including the audio of the LITA President’s program as well as the Great Debate. Stay tuned!

If you’re enjoying the podcasts, and want to make sure that this sort of thing continues within LITA and the ALA, let us know! Leave comments and suggestions so that we know what everyone wants to see moving forward…let us know who you enjoyed the most, and if you’d like to see something done differently in presenting these to you.

Thanks for listening to the LITA Top Tech Trends podcasts from ALA 2007, and stay tuned next week for the LITA President’s Program as well as the complete audio from the Great Debate!

Ambient Findability: Librarians, Libraries, and the Internet of Things

Slide 1 MorvilleAlthough not a LITA event, the ALCTS 50th Anniversary President’s Program, held on Monday, June 25, 2007, in the Renaissance Hotel Grand Ballroom South, should be of interest to many LITA members. Peter Morville, author of Ambient Findability and co-author of Information Architecture for the World Wide Web, provided an overview of his work to a standing-room-only crowd in an engaging and enlightening 90 minute presentation.

One of the things I really admire about Morville’s writing is his ability to concatenate a variety of different subjects and show how they’re all related to information management, and he does this just as well in The Land of Powerpoint. The talk covered gadgets like David Rose’s ambient devices, Microsoft Surface, the iPhone, RFID implants, and child-tracking wristwatches; websites including Neighboroo, Where’s Tim, Etsy, and the usual web suspects like Flickr, Amazon, and LibraryThing; as well as more philosophical stuff such as information anxiety, faceted classification, David Brin’s concept of reciprocal transparency in The Transparent Society, pace layering, IA and Web 2.0, search as a system, and Julian Bleecker’s “A Manifesto for Networked Objects”.

If you missed it: check out the presentation, read the books and Morville’s “UFOs: Ubiquitous Findable Objects”, and visit the Semantic Studios website and Morville’s findability blog.

See also: Jennifer Lang’s detailed write-up.